FUSE Muse
January 30, 2014 | Jake Katzsocial links

lost in thought
with Jake Katz

VP, Audience Insights & Strategy
at REVOLT

I'm inspired by the fact that we're in an era with more questions than answers.

My tools of the trade are people are more interesting than numbers

My favorite ad campaign didn't feel like an ad campaign

I lead by authentic curiosity and helpful ideas

To me, brilliant is passion, manifested

Best advice I ever received lean in to the sharp points

As of now, I'm totally over generational generalizations and manufactured trends

At the moment, I'm obsessed with finding the truth in the Millennial conversation

Dream project is a reality, it's called REVOLT's Road to Truth program. I'm traveling around the country with a camera crew, conducting interviews with everyone from real people in real settings to cultural icons defining our times.

When I'm having a creative block I practice marching band drum rudiments on a practice pad
photos
Find out more about Jake's participation in FUSE 2014 arrow © 2014 IIR Holdings, LTD. All Rights Reserved.
Today in media, everywhere we look we are seeing a shift to visual – including photos, infographics, illustrations, slideshows, memes, videos, and any other imagery that can be engaged with and shared. With more images and fewer words, visual content is the perfect answer for our busy schedules and hyper-engaged lives. Businesses looking to make an impact in today’s world should embrace this shift and the advantage that visuals provide to be seen and heard — quickly, clearly, and powerfully.

According to re:Design, here are 12 reasons why:

Visual focuses a brand. A consistent, visually-powerful brand is where it all begins and what needs to be maintained — it is also where many companies falter, adding to the noise rather than cutting through it.

Visual humanizes business interactions. People tend to shy away from stuffy business images, unless they’re after a deal. Visuals are a way to make a company more approachable, especially when combined with social engagement.

Visual alleviates confusion. A good visual strategy simplifies complex ideas, illuminates stories, improves user experiences, guides engagement, and aids customer service to help accomplish goals.

Visual energizes business. Robust branding and a visual strategy stimulates people. It excites people to work with you or use your products. It also revitalizes people inside the company as well.

Visual drives desired actions. Visuals inspire an emotional connection — the key for deeper engagement and getting your messages to resonate.

Visual harnesses scattered engagement. A consistent visual strategy is the glue that holds everything together. Rather than a disjointed effort, an effective visual strategy is seamless — online and offline.

Visual makes business social. People respond to visuals unlike any other content. People love to comment on them, laugh at them, share them, download them, and embed them.

Visual reinforces a brand story. An effective visual strategy conveys the same story at every point of engagement. Sealing what makes your company unique in the minds of your customers is the difference between standing apart and blending in.

Visual unifies diverse messages. Businesses have many messages they need to communicate to their various customers and niche markets. A visual campaign makes a powerful statement that brings them all together under one brand umbrella.

Visual establishes trust. Businesses that button-up their brands and communications in a way that presents a well thought out, quality organization, will always be more credible than those that do not. The thinking goes that if they are this together with themselves, they’ll be this together with the rest of their business operations too.

Visual inspires brand advocates. Great brands turn loyal fans into those who will also advocate for you. A visual strategy provides them the tools they need to share with their friends and tell the world what they think of you.

Visual expands influence. The more a company can harness its brand into a powerful force that people easily recognize and want to help promote — the broader the net will be cast to spread its influence and expand its markets. 


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Uniting brand strategists and designers, along with trend hunters and culture curators, the 18th annual FUSE conference celebrates a collaborative approach to building more meaningful brands. We're curating stories about fusing strategy and design in all its' forms to ignite brand passion and growth. Provocative discussions will cover graphic design, industrial design, experience design, digital communications, interactive design & social media, brand strategy, trends, culture and more.

For more information about FUSE, click here: http://bit.ly/1eEYdrg 
Everyone talks about mobile these days. So, how has mobile influence design?  At FUSE 2013 Milissa Tarquini, Vice President of User Experience & Design at Scripps Networks, discussed how mobile continues to influence design and shares some tips on how to design for mobile.

Design has been greatly influenced by mobile because of limitations of screen size and the limitations of devices, according to Tarquini.  “Designers have to be ruthless about what goes on any given screen at any given time and really think about their users and what their users are trying to accomplish,” she explained.

In digital design it was always about the desktop – someone sitting down to interact with something, and that’s not the way it is anymore. Now, it’s about what people are doing in the real world and what products you are bringing them that help them.

With her extensive experience, she has learned some dos and don’ts about designing in the mobile space. Tarquini suggests, “Get a stack of index cards and a sharpie and think about what fits on this tiny little screen that my fat fingers can press on that’s of value to me right now.”

“To be a designer, you have to be able to separate yourself from the things that you design, which is not intuitive and is not what a designer naturally does,” she said. When audiences look at things and have negative things to say about them, it’s crushing, but you have to get over that.”

Designing for mobile has been some of the most toughening experiences for Tarquini. If, as designer, you can choose what battles to fight, it’s critical. The most important thing is creating experiences that are usable, but not perfect.

Check out the full interview below:


Milissa Tarquini of Scripps Networks Inc. from IIR USA on Vimeo.

Uniting brand strategists and designers, along with trend hunters and culture curators, the 18th annual FUSE conference celebrates a collaborative approach to building more meaningful brands. We're curating stories about fusing strategy and design in all its' forms to ignite brand passion and growth. Provocative discussions will cover graphic design, industrial design, experience design, digital communications, interactive design & social media, brand strategy, trends, culture and more.

To learn about FUSE 2014 click here: http://bit.ly/KjaYN0


About the Author: Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs including Next Big DesignCustomers 1st, and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business Analysts, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc


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FUSE is a true multi-disciplinary experience, uniting all areas of design and brand strategy. It is a forum for all to share stories, inspiration and best practices. This year, we present our most Iconic and Inclusive experience ever.  Just Released - download the 2014 full brochure: http://bit.ly/1hDt770

FUSE 2014
April 7-9, 2014
Radisson Blu Aqua

Only FUSE 2014 will bring YOU face to face with the most iconic industry leaders in design and brand strategy today:

Indra Nooyi
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
PepsiCo, Inc.

Mauro Porcini
SVP, Chief Design Officer
PepsiCo, Inc.

Anthony Sperduti
Co-Owner & Creative Director
Partners & Spade

Tinker Hatfield
VP Creative Concepts
Nike

Simon Doonan
Creative Ambassador at Large
Barneys New York

Phil Duncan
Global Design Officer
Procter & Gamble

Douglas Rushkoff
Author
Present Shock

David S. Moore
Vice President & Chief Brand Officer
Ethan Allen

David Carson
Graphic Designer

Mirko Ilic
Co-author
Lettering Large

For the complete FUSE speaker lineup, download the brochure here: http://bit.ly/1hDt770

This lineup is just a taste of what FUSE 2014 has in store. This is your invitation to join us, share, be inspired and discover the magic of FUSE. 

Mention code FUSE14LI & Save 15% off the standard rate. Register today: http://bit.ly/1hDt770

Our very best,
The FUSE Team
@NextBigDesign
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German automotive companies are known around the world as the leader in producing the most innovative automotive products. To celebrate, FEI: Front End of Innovation Munich is giving you special access to these top organizations.

• New Approaches to Improve the Fuzzy Front End: Combining Creativity, Competence and Knowledge, Stephan Oertelt, Innovation Manager, BMW Group

• The Anatomy of Legendary Design, Frank Stephenson, Design Director, McLaren Automotive

Frank Stephenson, McLaren Automotive
PLUS- Get outsides the conference walls and go behind the scenes at BMW:

• Managing Innovation through Cross Industry Learning: How Cultural Research Can Pave the Way to New Approaches in Design
Sonja Schiefer, Director, Munich Studio, BMW Group DesignworksUSA

Don't stand still in a fast moving world. Hear firsthand how leading automotive companies and designers are capturing and directing change.

The tour of the Munich Studio will give you insights into the company´s innovation principle of Cross Fertilization, a cross industry knowledge transfer, and you will see how it has inspired groundbreaking design solutions in the train, yacht, aviation or lifestyle sector.

The design team will let you dive into the visionary thinking of the automotive industry and illustrate how other sectors can participate in the automotive innovation culture.

Learn how thinking decades ahead and considering customers in their future cultural context can open up new design perspectives that will bring about new opportunities for business. This session is limited to 20 people, make sure to register today!

Take a short look at last year's event in Copenhagen below:



FEI EMEA brings together the best of the best in innovation across the EMEA. Join us for FEI EMEA 2014, 4-6 February in Munich and experience for yourself why the FEI brand is recognized as the World Leader in Advancing Innovation across industries.
Today, marketing messages are coming at you everywhere you go. In fact, customers are bombarded with thousands of marketing images and messages every single day - more than 5,000 to be exact, according to researchers.  When you’re standing in line at the grocery store, when you’re driving down the street, when you’re watching TV and, whenever you’re online, someone is trying to sell you something. This leads to “communication fatigue”—meaning we are bombarded by so many messages that we end up ignoring more to keep our heads from exploding.

So, what does this mean for your brand? It means crafting the best marketing campaign in the world may not cut it anymore, if consumers are not interested in what you have to say. It’s not enough to stand out in a crowd--your brand also has to draw that crowd in. According to Fast Company, this is known as Magnetic Branding, which causes the consumers to pursue your products.

Instead of trying to get the average person to view your marketing, you put into motion strategies that will attract them to it. If you’re Apple or Google, virtually anything you do is pulling people towards you, but most brands don’t have that kind of mystique.  However, there are ways to create it.

Here’s how:

Utilize Popularity

When Dodge was approached by Paramount Pictures to use Will Ferrell in his character as Ron Burgundy, you might not have blamed them for turning down the idea of having a buffoon pitch their vehicles.  You also might have thought Dodge management would have a nervous breakdown when Ferrell as Burgundy went on national talk shows declaring their cars were “terrible.” Nobody takes this character seriously, but they do go out of their way to see him. The gamble paid off in a big way as Dodge sales spiked by as much as 35 percent. This is a short-term brand strategy, but if you have a quality product that’s being ignored, as Dodge had with its Durango SUV, it’s worth teaming up with someone who can make some noise to create the buzz that brings you sales.


Whatever you’re marketing to consumers has to have a certain level of quality in place that will make buyers interested in coming back for more. You can’t just make grand claims about your brand and not be able to back them up. To create a belief system that sticks, you must be focused, consistent, and passionate about your products--and communicate those qualities to your potential buyers.


Female consumers are traditionally marketed to with images of beautiful women whose looks are unrealistic. That fact of advertising can be intimidating to an average woman’s self-image--a fact reflected by that reported that only two percent of the female population would describe themselves as beautiful. So, Unilever realized they had a huge marketing opportunity; they had to find a way to help women feel better about the way they looked.

A worldwide campaign called “Real Beauty,” launched in 2004 on behalf of their Dove product line. The campaign, which showcased real women instead of supermodels, hit a real emotional nerve and was a success; sales skyrocketed by 20 percent in the next year. The Dove campaign case study makes it clear that when you can identify and meet a huge need in your target audience, you create a powerful attraction that is the hallmark of the Magnetic Brand.



About the Author: Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs including Next Big DesignCustomers 1st, and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business Analysts, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc
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At FUSE 2013 Vince Voron, AVP & Head of Design for Coca-Cola North America, discusses pushing change to the role of the designer in an organization and what it takes to be influential as a designer.

Today, the role of the designer in a large organization is best suited to the innovative integrator. The designer should actively help affect change within the company as well as provoke, inspire, and connect in order to bring about positive business change through design.

In a lot of corporations, design is misunderstood and designers themselves are misunderstood. Designers are able to differentiate themselves which can actually help them be great brand partners because they are able to create visual design systems to help brands differentiate themselves from competitors.

Check out the full interview below:


Vince Voron of the Coca-Cola Company from IIR USA on Vimeo.

To learn about FUSE 2014 click here: http://bit.ly/1eqUArP
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